Climate smart cocoa systems for Ghana (CLIMCOCOA)

Project Timeframe:
Jan 2016 to Dec 2020

Funding

Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA)

Partner(s)

university of Ghana(UG) | Cocoa Research Institute of Ghana (CRIG) | University of Copenhagen (UCPH) | University of Roskilde (RUC) | International Institute of Tropical Agriculture(IITA)

Challenge:

Cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) is one of the world’s major commodities and represents the most important source of revenue for the numerous small-scale farmers in Ghana. Climate change (CC) in the form of increasing temperature and reduced rainfall patterns is likely to affect cocoa productivity because cocoa is increasingly being planted outside its natural agroecological region (rainforests). In view of this, it is speculated that CC will decrease the area suitable for cocoa cultivation, however, the extent and the mechanism through which this occurs are not well understood.

Action:

CLIMCOCOA aims to develop a comprehensive understanding of the impacts of climate change on the socio-biophysical basis of cocoa systems in Ghana and assess the role of agroforestry as a model for climate and carbon smart agriculture.

A multidisciplinary approach is used to assess the biophysical limitations and options for cocoa cultivation under CC, and to assess the institutional arrangements and socio-economic factors that favor or limit adoption of innovation management options by farmers.

Impact:

CLIMcocoa is expected to:

  • Enhance the capacity of 350,000 families who have cocoa as their principal income to be more resilient to impact of CC on cocoa productivity.
  • Build state-of-the-art knowledge of cocoa agroforestry, management of pests and diseases, cocoa ecophysiology and cocoa-based livelihoods in Ghana.
  • Build capacities of local researchers to apply state of the art modelling tools to assess CC impact.
  • Generate new knowledge which, with only minor adjustments, will likely be applicable regionally, especially to Côte d’Ivoire and other major cocoa producing countries.

 

 

Principal Investigator: 
Philippe Vaast