Scaling up Climate-Smart Agroforestry Technologies for improved market access, food and nutritional security in Mali (SmAT-Scaling) -"Feed-the-Future"

Project Goal

Enhance access to and use of tree-based climate-smart technologies through effective scaling-up of already-developed and proven agroforestry technologies and improved market access, in order to increase food and nutritional security, as well as build resilience of farming systems

Objectives

  1. Identify tree-based, climate-smart agriculture practices from existing options and disseminate them  using village-based extension approaches;
  2. Promote community-based tree seed/seedling production and delivery systems and;
  3. Develop diversified market opportunities for tree products with high nutritional and economic value; 
  4. Create awareness about and improve rural communities’ consumption of nutritious tree products, including fruits and leafy vegetables for improved food and nutritional security, especially during the hungry season;
  5. Improve awareness among policy makers and development actors for a widespread adoption of tree-based climate smart practices; and
  6. Strengthen the capacity of stakeholders, including poor rural communities, for better adaptation to climate extremes and disasters, and set up innovation platforms for knowledge sharing and co-learning.
  7. Develop public – private partnership (PPP) on Shea, Beeswax and Jatropha value chains

Project gender specific objectives in terms of:

  • Create awareness and improve rural communities consumption of tree-based nutritious tree products including fruits and tree-based leafy vegetable for improved food and nutritional security
  • Improve the quality and competiveness of shea products, strengthening cooperative organization, finances and management as well as improving food and nutrition security
  • Create wealth to improve livelihoods and strengthen the resiliency of rural women through the development of sustainable organic beeswax production and marketing
  • Set up an efficient supply chain of Jatropha grains collection, install a soap factory unit and add value to the press cake through processing into organic fertilizer and add glycerin valuation for soap.

What we intend to achieve:

The 5 years’ project targets are as follows:

  • Building capacities/Training of 48 Trainers (100%women) and 5200 beneficiaries undergoing in project intervention villages on culinary/cooking demonstrations with marketers and processors
  •  Improving the quality and competiveness of shea Products, strengthening cooperative organization, finances and management as well as improving food and nutrition security of 14,000 women

-          Create wealth to improve livelihoods and strengthen the resiliency of rural women through the development of sustainable organic beeswax production and marketing with 3,000 women

  • Setting up an efficient supply chain of Jatropha grains collection, installing a soap factory unit and adding value to the press cake through processing into organic fertilizer and add glycerin valuation for soap are benefiting to 6050 including 2732 women
  • 240,000 individuals received training on agricultural productivity or food security
  • 200,000 farmers apply climate-smart agricultural practices
  • 47,000 ha of land under climate-smart agricultural practices
  • 40,000 households use climate information in their decision-making and implement risk-reducing practices to improve their resilience to climate change
  • Prevalence of stunted and wasted children under 5 years old reduced by 5%
  • Prevalence of children 6-23 months receiving a minimum acceptable diet increased by 20%
  • Household dietary diversity increased by at least 3%.
  • Train the communities of the project location on improved conservation methods for highly nutritional tree products being conducted with 7,350 beneficiaries (including at least 50% women) in Sikasso, Mopti, and Timbuktu.

Where we work

2015 Annual report  Download

The SmAT-Scaling Project is funded by USAID operating under the guidance of the USAID/Malis Feed the Future (FtF) strategy and implemented by a consortium headed by the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) in partnership with Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Aga Khan Foundation (AKF), World Vision (WV), Inter Church Cooperation (ICCO), Mali Biocarburant S.A. (MBSA), Near East Foundation (NEF), Institut dEconomie Rurale (IER) and Regional Directorates of Agriculture, Water and Forest (DRA&DREF). It aims to strengthen the value chain of tree products, improve the nutritional status and food security of the targeted population, and build local capacity. The overall objective of the project is to enhance access to and use of tree-based climate-smart technologies (including fodder) through effective scaling-up of already-developed and proven climate-smart technologies and improved market access, in order to increase food and nutritional security, as well as build resilience of farming systems in the Feed the Future Zone of Mali. The project aims at contributing to increasing agricultural productivity, market access, household income and consumption of agroforestry-based products to improve the food security, nutrition and health status of rural women and children in Mali. Research insights and outputs produced under the framework of the CGIAR Research Program on Drylands Systems on both gender and youth were used to develop the implementation and upscaling approach of this USAID- funded SmAT-Scaling Project.

The project focus on a sub-set of the 109 communes that comprise the Feed the Future zone across Sikasso, Segou, Koulikoro, Kayes, Mopti and Timbuktu with activities across 810 villages.

Implementation strategy

To improve food security, nutrition and health, while also safeguarding ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes, agricultural productivity gains must go hand-in-hand with better market access, improved household income and increased consumption of nutritious-dense food (fruits and vegetables).

 

The major Implementation approaches consist of:

  • Bottom-up, demand-driven, market oriented;
  •  multi-stakeholder innovation platforms;
  • Rural Resource Centres: training and demonstration hubs managed by grassroots organisations. They create opportunities for farmers to share their experiences peer-to-peer and to receive technical guidance and services that are tailored to their livelihood needs, all under one roof.
  • Capacity building, demonstrations and learning visits
  • Radio broadcasting and
  • Public-private partnerships

Proven agroforestry technologies disseminated through RRC

 

Key services that Rural Resource Centres provide:

  • Skills development in areas such as nursery practices, tree propagation, group dynamics and marketing;
  • Information on new technologies and innovations;
  • Links with market actors particularly form the private sector;
  • Access to market information;
  • Forum for exchange of information among farmers, and between farmers and other stakeholders;
  • Seeds, seedlings and other inputs.

 

The World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) and partners have introduced and diffused in various areas different agroforestry technologies. The majority of these promising technologies have remained at experimental level or in the best cases village-limited.

a) Shrub/tree fodder banks with Gliricidia sepium, Pterocarpus erinaceus and P. lucens,

b)  Live fencing with Jatropha curcas 

c)  Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) with Acacia senegal (gum Arabic), Vitellaria paradoxa (Shea trees), Parkia biglobosa (nere) or Faidherbia albida,

d)  Fruit trees in crop fields and parklands;

e)  Food banks with Adansonia digitata (baobab), Moringa oleifera,

f)   Soil and water management techniques (zaï, half moons, stone contours).

To complement cereals and livestock-based production systems.

A ‘typical’ RRC comprises of a tree nursery, demonstration plots, a training hall, a small library and office spaces. Accommodation, catering facilities, and agricultural processing unit may also be part of the RRC depending on available resources, opportunities and needs

What organisations are involved?

The Project, funded by USAID-Mali, is being implemented by the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF) for a period of five years [2014-2019]. Field activities are being implemented in partnership with Aga Khan Foundation (AKF), World Vision Mali (WV) and Catholic Relief Services (CRS), the Interchurch Organization for Development Cooperation (ICCO Cooperation), Mali Biocarburant SA (MBSA), the Near East Foundation (NEF), Institut d'Economie Rurale (IER) and Regional Directorates of Agriculture and Forest (DRA & DREF).

Contact Us

World Agroforestry Centre/ Sahel Office

BP E5118, Bamako, Mali

Tel: (+223) 2023 5000 / 2022 3375

Contact person: Dr Arinloye Ademonla Djalal

Email: a.arinloye@cgiar.org

 

 

Trees are a vital component to achieve more resilience against climate variation, economic shocks and conflict.

 SOATAF, TERAFINA and OIKO, Olvea-Burkina